Tag Archives: goodreads

Risuko Release Day Events!

Release day for Risuko (June 15, 2016) is almost here
The Squirrel has landed! (The first shipment of Risuko first editions arrives)

Release day for Risuko: A Kunoichi Tale (June 15) is almost here! We’ve got lots of exciting news for you — and more on the way. So keep checking on Stillpoint Digital Press, Risuko.net, Facebook, Tumblr, Instagram, and Twitter!

If you haven’t read it, check out David Kudler’s post on writing Risuko, The Magic of History: Writing historical fiction as fantasy.

See below for some of what we’ve got in store for you! Continue reading Risuko Release Day Events!

Win a signed copy of Risuko!

With just six weeks to go until the release of Risuko: A Kunoichi Tale, you can avoid the wait and enter to win a signed copy of Risuko today!

Through this Friday, author David Kudler is giving away a signed advance copy of his historical teen thriller on Goodreads:

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Risuko by David Kudler

Risuko

by David Kudler

Giveaway ends May 06, 2016.

See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway


Set in sixteenth-century Japan wracked by civil war, Risuko follows the journey of a young woman who is recruited to become a kunoichi. What does that mean, how will she adapt, and can one girl affect the outcome of a hundred years of civil war?

Interested in finding out more?

Sign up today to receive the subscriber-exclusive prequel tale “White Robes: A Kunoichi Companion Tale”!

Win a copy of Risuko on Goodreads!

Stillpoint author David Kudler is giving away a copy of his teen historical adventure Risuko on Goodreads!

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Risuko by David Kudler

Risuko

by David Kudler

Giveaway ends April 01, 2016.

See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

Goodreads Risuko Giveaway!

This week, you have the opportunity to win a free copy of Risuko on Goodreads! Author David Kudler has made a paperback ARC (advance review copy) available on the world’s biggest book review site:

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Risuko by David Kudler

Risuko

by David Kudler

Giveaway ends December 18, 2015. See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

Sign up now to win your free copy!

Continue reading Goodreads Risuko Giveaway!

Giveaway! Win a free advance copy of Risuko: A Kunoichi Tale

We’re holding a giveaway on Goodreads to win an advance copy of Risuko: A Kunoichi Tale by author/publisher David Kudler!

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Risuko by David Kudler

Risuko

by David Kudler

Giveaway ends October 16, 2015.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

Enter to be one of the first to read this exciting young-adult historical adventure story. Continue reading Giveaway! Win a free advance copy of Risuko: A Kunoichi Tale

Everything Amazon Slides

Here are the slides from my presentation with Ruth Schwartz on Everything Amazon:

It was — as always — a great meeting! If you have any questions about any of the slides, please comment.

ETA: The URL for CreateSpace (slides 8–12) should be http://createspace.com, not createspace.amazon.com.

Authors: 6 Reasons You Have to Be on Goodreads

Books by telmo32 (flickr.com)This past Saturday at BAIPA, I led a roundtable about the reasons that every independent author and publisher (as well as every “dependent” author) needed to have an active presence on Goodreads.com. It was one of three roundtable sessions at the time, and I assumed that most BAIPA folks (who are pretty savvy) would already know most of what I had to say. I was surprised to find that not only did they not, but they were very hungry to hear about the world’s largest book review site

Because they all found the material I presented to be helpful, I thought I’d share my major points here. This is why you have to be on Goodreads: Continue reading Authors: 6 Reasons You Have to Be on Goodreads

How can I promote my book for free?

Bookstore by Natalia Romay; used through a Creative Commons LicenseEvery author wants to know how to get the word out about his or her book — and most are frightened that it’s going to cost an arm and a leg. To be honest, the most effective marketing that an author can do doesn’t involve paying money. Just lots and lots of time and effort. So not free, really, but no-cost, at least!

Before you hire a publicist or start looking at paid ads on Facebook, Goodreads, Google Adwords, Bing, Twitter, etc., be sure that you have done everything that you can to let the appropriate people know about your book. Contact all of your friends and family, obviously, and encourage them to share the information about your book with everyone they know. Send well-crafted, focussed press releases to newspapers, magazines, and radio stations that might be interested in your subject. Continue reading How can I promote my book for free?

Six things you should be including in your ebook (and probably aren’t)

Or, How to Use Your Ebooks as Your Best Marketing Platform

Last month I came up with a flash of inspiration: a way to use ebooks to market themselves. After trying it out on a number of my own ebooks, I wrote a post for Joel Friedlander’s wonderful resource for independent publishers, TheBookDesigner.com.

That post sparked a lot of interest and so I knew I wanted to share it here as well. (Since a number of folks have asked: yes, I will help you do this if you’d like. The directions here should be easy to follow — for someone comfortable getting in under the HTML hood of an ebook. Not everyone is, however, and so I can provide assistance. Just email me at editor@stillpointdigital.com head on over to our new order page for Smidget — the social media widget for ebooks!

Quick: who—aside from you, your immediate family, and your dog—are the people most excited about your book, most ready to talk about it with their friends, and best equipped to talk about your book’s virtues? Anyone?

Well, there are lots of possible answers for each of those questions, but when it comes to identifying the whole bunch, I’d bet it’s a group that you haven’t thought much about: The people who have just finished the last page.

Think about it. If someone has actually finished your book, they’re committed to it. They’re interested in what you have had to say, and it’s fresh in their minds. They are your ideal advocates, your perfect evangelists for generating more excitement about your work and making sure that people hear about it. So what are you doing to harness that potential?

Most self-publishers don’t do much of anything. Maybe they put a bio at the back, and, possibly a link to their web page. Commercial publishers don’t do a whole lot more—they’ll put a list of similar titles the reader might be interested in, and, if they’re very twenty-first century, they’ll hyperlink those titles to the appropriate pages on their site.

Those are all really, really good ideas, and a great way to make the next sale. Is that enough? No, no, no.

What are you going to do to make sure that this title finds its audience? How are you going to harness that band of potential sales reps who’ve just finished your book and really want to talk with someone about it? I was thinking about this recently, and realized that the answer was pretty simple, when you remember that an ebook is simply a specialized web page. You do something like this: Continue reading Six things you should be including in your ebook (and probably aren’t)

Six things you should be including in your ebook (and probably aren't)

Or, How to Use Your Ebooks as Your Best Marketing Platform

Last month I came up with a flash of inspiration: a way to use ebooks to market themselves. After trying it out on a number of my own ebooks, I wrote a post for Joel Friedlander’s wonderful resource for independent publishers, TheBookDesigner.com.

That post sparked a lot of interest and so I knew I wanted to share it here as well. (Since a number of folks have asked: yes, I will help you do this if you’d like. The directions here should be easy to follow — for someone comfortable getting in under the HTML hood of an ebook. Not everyone is, however, and so I can provide assistance.

I’ve created a service to add these buttons to your ebook; head on over to our new order page for Smidget — the social media widget for ebooks!

Quick: who—aside from you, your immediate family, and your dog—are the people most excited about your book, most ready to talk about it with their friends, and best equipped to talk about your book’s virtues? Anyone?

Well, there are lots of possible answers for each of those questions, but when it comes to identifying the whole bunch, I’d bet it’s a group that you haven’t thought much about: The people who have just finished the last page.

Think about it. If someone has actually finished your book, they’re committed to it. They’re interested in what you have had to say, and it’s fresh in their minds. They are your ideal advocates, your perfect evangelists for generating more excitement about your work and making sure that people hear about it. So what are you doing to harness that potential?

Most self-publishers don’t do much of anything. Maybe they put a bio at the back, and, possibly a link to their web page. Commercial publishers don’t do a whole lot more—they’ll put a list of similar titles the reader might be interested in, and, if they’re very twenty-first century, they’ll hyperlink those titles to the appropriate pages on their site.

Those are all really, really good ideas, and a great way to make the next sale. Is that enough? No, no, no.

What are you going to do to make sure that this title finds its audience? How are you going to harness that band of potential sales reps who’ve just finished your book and really want to talk with someone about it? I was thinking about this recently, and realized that the answer was pretty simple, when you remember that an ebook is simply a specialized web page. You do something like this: Continue reading Six things you should be including in your ebook (and probably aren't)